Julian Agudelo

Julian Agudelo

Julian Agudelo

Julian Agudelo

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Sales Teams Want Better UX Design. Not Another ‘Masterclass’ Training Day.

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Salespeople resent being ignored. Just ask 25 year old me. Back then I knew nothing about UX design.

Me: “Im having some great conversations, though I notice some prospects go cold after viewing the website. Perhaps we should look at getting the UX looked at?

Boss: “Leave it with me. I’ll raise it at the next management meeting.”

Nothing was done.

Instead an already experienced sales team was lumbered with yet more vacuous, two dimensional training interventions that treated the symptoms, not the cause.

Eventually I handed in my notice, became a copywriter and discovered the value of UX design as a business development strategy.

What Was Wrong With The Sales Team? Nothing. It was the Website that Needed Work.

Sales training interventions aren’t necessarily ‘a bad idea’.

The problem is they’re often hurriedly thrown at the problem of poor sales performance and selected as the wrong tool for the job.

If your UX design is in pieces, retraining an experienced team can patronise, waste time and money while compounding the problem by forcing salespeople to adopt unified, generic approaches that simply don’t come naturally to them.

What’s the value of making the holes on one side of the the net smaller, if there’s a gaping hole at the other end?

UX Design is as viable a strategic investment as product design.

In a junior sales role my boss of that time, Intuit’s Global Sales Lead was flown in from Australia to drill us on tried and tested approaches to prospect conversion.

During a 5-day sales boot camp, a young, nervy sales team hardened into confident closers. All 5 of us did a personal best the following quarter.

Why did sales performance improve across the whole team?

Because the marketing manager knew that UX design, a high converting website, and an effective sales team all go hand in hand. They’re part of the same net.

The marketing manager listened to the sales team and invested in improving website UX design, starting with a website audit.

The outcomes?

Smoother site navigation
Clarification of copy and messaging
Redesigned CTAs and page structure
Improved site speed
Reduced bounce rate
Higher prospect conversion

And it cost less than the training intervention.

The day we got back to our desks from the week-long sales training, the new site went live—both the sales team and the website were on point as a single, cohesive user experience that formed a powerful and consistent buyer journey, without any weak points.

How to Make Your Website Your Best Performing Salesperson?

Prospects spend more and more time online with access to competitors and TONS of information at their fingertips. They do their homework once they’ve spoken with your team.

They’ll Google you.
Read reviews about you.
Check your social channels.
Speak to your sales team.
And view your website.

If your website UX design is weak, it doesn’t matter how good your sales team is.

You will lose sales you should have landed.

Run a website audit & do a heuristic analysis

You don’t need to overspend on redesigning and launching a new website or paying more sales trainers.

Often a ground level website audit is the most cost-effective way of fixing sales pipeline performance because it uncovers hidden sales funnel issues that remain out of sight when you only look at your team’s dial figures.

When we perform website audits for clients, we look at how the website UX design can be strengthened and tweaked to provide intuitive, meaningful, valuable and engaging experiences that help prospects trust and buy-into what the sales team is telling them.

Ask yourself these questions:

Is website site speed harming the sales team?

Deloitte: Milliseconds Cost Millions report — Have a read. It’s alarming stuff.

Just half a second in extra page load time can cause prospects to simply go back to Google in frustration and find your competitor.

Is the overall user journey harming the sales team?

Sometimes a specific page, proposition message, CTA button or page layout causes enough friction to affect conversion.

Read Insightful UX’s guide on how to use HotJar’s website user heat mapping and UX journey analysis tools to evaluate for yourself where your website UX needs work.

When was the last time we even tested our UX design with a heuristic analysis of user behaviour?

Ultimately, your website UX design needs to be held as accountable as your sales team. If something in your website user journey is causing it to drop prospects, no amount of sales training will fix that.

Don’t Let Your Website Let Your Sales Team Down.

Ask us about a website audit as the most cost-effective way to first at least check where your website is dropping the ball, then you can look into making the changes effectively in the right areas, so that your website doesn’t continue to let the team down.

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Julian Agudelo

Julian Agudelo

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